Wednesday, June 21, 2017

1000 French Words Sorted by Frequency of Use

This list contains the 1000 most frequent french words, sorted by frequency.

Credits to wiktionary.

The full thing can be downloaded, for free, here: https://anonfiles.cc/file/90416cbdc470db512742183583b438bd

This is the 1.0 draft, in the next draft I will enumerate the words (for example: 1.de 2.je 3.est ... and so on). They are not enumerated but they are sorted by frequency.

Preview:

de

Etymology

From Latin .

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /də/
             Rhymes:

Preposition

de
1.          of (expresses belonging)
            1837, Louis Viardot, chapter I, in L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manchefr.Wikisource, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra:
            Dans une bourgade de la Manche, dont je ne veux pas me rappeler le nom, vivait, il n’y a pas longtemps, un hidalgo ....
            In a village of La Mancha, whose name I do not want to remember, lived, not long ago, an hidalgo ....
               Paris est la capitale de la France. ― Paris is the capital of France.
               En 1905, les églises devinrent la propriété de l'État. ― In 1905, churches became the property of the state.
2.          of (used to express property or association)
               Œuvres de Fermat ― Fermat’s Works
               Elle est la femme de mon ami. ― She is my friend’s wife.
               le voisin de Gabriel ― Gabriel's neighbor
3.          from (used to indicate origin)
               Elle vient de France. ― She comes from France.
               Êtes-vous de Suisse ? ― Are you from Switzerland?
               Ce fromage vient d’Espagne. ― This cheese is from Spain.
               C’est de l’ouest de la France. ― It’s from the west of France.
               Le train va de Paris à Bordeaux. ― The train goes from Paris to Bordeaux.
4.          of (indicates an amount)
               5 kilos de pommes. ― 5 kilograms of apples.
               Un verre de vin ― A glass of wine
               Une portion de frites ― A portion of fries
5.          used attributively, often translated into English as a compound word
               Un jus de pomme ― An apple juice
               Un verre de vin ― A glass of wine
               Une boîte de nuit ― A night club
               Un chien de garde ― A guard dog
               Une voiture de sport ― A sports car
               Un stade de football ― A football stadium
6.          from (used to indicate the start of a time or range)
               De 9:00 à 11:00 je ne serai pas libre.From 9 to 11 I won’t be free.
               Je travaille de huit heures à midi. ― I work from 8 o'clock to noon.
               un groupe de cinq à huit personnes ― a group of [from] five to eight people
7.          used after certain verbs before an infinitive, often translating into English as a gerund or an infinitive
               J’ai arrêté de fumer. ― I stopped smoking.
               Il continue de m’embêter. ― He keeps annoying me.
               Elle m’a dit de venir. ― She told me to come.
               Nous vous proposons de venir. ― We suggest you to come.
8.          by
               Boire trois tasses par jour réduirait de 20 % les risques de contracter une maladie. ― Drinking three cups a day would reduce the risk of catching an illness by 20%.

Usage notes

Before a word beginning with a vowel sound, de elides to d’. Before the article le, it contracts with the article into du, as shown in the example above. Before the article les, it contracts with the article into des.
Le Songe d’une nuit d’été — “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (Literally, “The Dream of a night of summer”)
La queue du chien — “The dog’s tail”
Index des auteurs — “Index of the authors”

Article

de
1.          (indefinite) some; any (in questions or negatives)
               Je voudrais de la viande. ― I would like some meat.
               Est-ce qu'il y a de la bonne musique ? ― Is there any good music?
               Nous cherchons du lait. ― We're looking for some milk.
2.          (negative) a, an, any
               Elle n'a pas de mère. ― She does not have a mother.
               Il n'a pas de crayon. ― He does not have a pencil.
               Je n'ai pas de temps. ― I do not have any time.

Usage notes

In the positive, de is usually used with a definite article, as in the examples. In the negative, without an article.

Derived terms

             (contractions): d’, du, des

Anagrams

             ed, éd.

External links

             de” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

je

Etymology

From Old French jo, from Vulgar Latin *eo, from Latin ego, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Near cognates include Spanish yo and Italian io. Further cognates include Ancient Greek ἐγώ (egṓ), Russian я (ya) English I, German ich, etc.

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /ʒə/
             Rhymes:

Pronoun

je (first person singular, plural nous, object me, emphatic moi)
1.          I

Usage notes

             When several pronouns are included in the same sentence, it is considered impolite to say the pronoun je first; it must be the last one, and tu must be said after third persons (this applies also for toi and moi):
            Nous irons, Rose, toi et moi.
            You, Rose, and I will go.

Derived terms

             j'

Related terms

French personal pronouns

External links

             je” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

est

Etymology 1

From Old French, from Old English ēast.

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /ɛst/

Adjective

est m, f (invariable)
1.          east

Noun

est m (plural est)
1.          east

Synonyms

             orient, levant

Etymology 2

From Latin est, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti.

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /ɛ/

Verb

est
1.          third-person singular present indicative of être
Derived terms
             c'est

Anagrams

             set, Ste., tes

External links

             est” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

pas

Etymology

From Latin passus. Its use as an auxiliary adverb comes from an accusative use (Latin nec...passum) in negative constructions – literally ‘not...a step’, i.e. ‘not at all’ – originally used with certain verbs of motion.

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /pa/, /pɑ/

Noun

pas m (plural pas)
1.          step, pace, footstep
2.          (geography) strait (e.g., Pas de Calais, ""Strait of Dover"")

Derived terms

             à pas de loup

Adverb

pas
1.          (ne ... pas) not
               Je ne sais pas.‎ ― I don't know
2.          (colloquial) not
               J’veux pas travailler.‎ ― I don't wanna work.
               (abbreviation of: Je ne veux pas travailler.)

Derived terms

             pourquoi pas
             je ne comprends pas

Related terms

             passage
             passer

External links

             pas” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).



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